October 7, 1978: First Edition

Embed from Getty Images

(Pictured: Bob Seger, rockin’ a Springsteen T-shirt, 1978.)

(This post is a historic one, as it’s the very first One Day in Your Life post I ever wrote at The Hits Just Keep on Comin’. The first few editions looked a lot different than the later ones would. Although I have revised most of the early ones that have and will appear here, I’m gonna put this one up almost exactly as it appeared back on October 7, 2004. I’ve made some cosmetic edits and added a link, plus Perspective From the Present at the very end. If I’m recalling correctly, I wrote the original on some public library computer while killing a morning on the road. )

Any given day can be filled with historic events, but some time has to pass before we recognize them as such. October 7, 1978, was one of those days. The Los Angeles Dodgers advanced to the World Series that night, and after the game was over, we turned on the radio.

Bob Seger’s “Hollywood Nights” peaked at #12 on the singles chart that day. It’s the quintessential Bob Seger record—a smart lyric about making your way in a world that wants to steal your money and break your heart, delivered with Seger’s trademark crunch. All-time classic lines: “She had been born with a face that would let her get her way / He saw that face and he lost all control.” Boston’s “Don’t Look Back” peaked at # 4. We would have been surprised to know that it would be their last major hit for eight years, until “Amanda” in 1986.

The Rolling Stones performed “Beast of Burden” and “Respectable” on Saturday Night Live. [Editor’s note: And also “Shattered.”] This was the night Mick grossed out America by licking Ron Wood’s cheek in mid-solo.

Toto’s first single, “Hold the Line,” was released debuted on the Hot 100 at #84. [I stopped using release dates in these posts fairly early on because a large percentage of Internet resources get them wrong, and chart dates are better anyhow.—ed.] Can you think of an artist that sold more records and got less love than Toto? “Hold the Line” became a radio hit because it sounded like it should be one—perfect for both Top 40 and album-rock formats.

John Mellencamp celebrated his 27th birthday. It would be the last time he celebrated a birthday without having it mentioned on lists of notable birthdays, because by the time he would turn 28, the album Nothin’ Matters and What If It Did would be out, and the single “I Need a Lover” would be on its way up the charts.

Perspective From the Present: On the Billboard Hot 100 dated 10/7/78, the top two were the same as the previous week: “Kiss You All Over” by Exile and former #1 hit “Boogie Oogie Oogie” by A Taste of Honey. Nick Gilder’s “Hot Child in the City” was up to #3 in its 18th week on; three weeks hence it would finally take out “Kiss You All Over” and set a record for the slowest-cooking #1 hit of all time. “How Much I Feel” by Ambrosia made the biggest leap within the 40, from #29 to #16; “Double Vision” by Foreigner went from #38 to #26. New songs in the 4o were “Took the Last Train” by David Gates, “Ready to Take a Chance Again” by Barry Manilow, and “Sweet Life” by Paul Davis. In addition to “Hold the Line,” eight other records debuted on the Hot 100, all between #80 and #90. Other than “Hold the Line,” Justin Hayward’s “Forever Autumn” (#82) and Chaka Khan’s “I’m Every Woman” (#86), the rest of them remained obscure. If you remember “Martha” by Gabriel (the highest debut of the week at #80) or “Mellow Lovin'” by Judy Cheeks (#88), maybe you should be writing this blog.

Advertisements