June 14, 1994: Questioning

June 14, 1994, was a Tuesday. Headlines this morning include the murders of Nicole Brown-Simpson, wife of O. J. Simpson, and Ronald Goldman, who were found stabbed early yesterday. Police have already questioned the ex-football star as a potential witness. President Clinton and the First Lady were questioned separately under oath on Sunday as part of the special counsel’s investigation of the Whitewater land deals in Arkansas. Some questions involved the death of former aide Vincent Foster. A jury in Anchorage, Alaska, has ruled that victims of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill can seek damages for negligence from Exxon and the ship’s captain, Joseph Hazelwood. A fireball was seen in the sky across the northeastern United States and in Canada last night; a meteorite that landed on a farm in Quebec is the largest ever recorded in Canada, weighing 2.3 kilograms. Today, Erie, Pennsylvania, is flooded after getting three inches of rain in about two hours.

Much of tonight’s primetime TV lineup is reruns. On ABC, it’s Full House, Roseanne (the top-rated show of the night), Coach, NYPD Blue, and the sitcom Phenom, about a teenage tennis star being raised with two siblings by a single mom. CBS repeats an episode of Rescue 911 and the TV movie My Son Johnny starring Michele Lee and Ricky Schroder. On NBC, After the Headlines is a new where-are-they-now special about recent newsmakers hosted by Kathleen Sullivan; it’s followed by two episodes of The John Larroquette Show and a new edition of Dateline NBC. The Fox lineup includes South Central, Roc, and two episodes of Tales From the Crypt.

At Madison Square Garden in New York, the Rangers win their first Stanley Cup in 54 years, beating the Vancouver Canucks in the deciding seventh game of the final. After the game, Canucks fans riot in downtown Vancouver, resulting in about $1.1 million in damage. The Canucks will not return to the Cup final until 2011, when they will again lose in seven games, and their fans will again riot. Madison Square Garden will be the scene of the NBA Finals tomorrow night. It’s Game 4 between the Knicks and the Houston Rockets; the Rockets lead the series 2-1. Pitcher Monte Weaver, who won 71 games in a nine-year major league career spent mostly with the Washington Senators during the 1930s, dies one day short of his 88th birthday. Composer, conductor, and arranger Henry Mancini dies of pancreatic cancer at age 70.

The Grateful Dead play Seattle, Phish plays Des Moines, and Danzig plays Philadelphia. The first Bluegrass Night at the Ryman is held in Nashville, starring Bill Monroe and Alison Krauss. On the Billboard Hot 100, “I Swear” by All 4 One is in the fourth of what will be 11 straight weeks at #1; a country version of the song by John Michael Montgomery is at #84. Madonna’s “I’ll Remember” and “Any Time Any Place” by Janet Jackson hold at #2 and #3. “Don’t Turn Around” by Ace of Base is #4. The Ace of Base album The Sign spends a second week at #1, its first at the top since the week of April 2. Although six other albums will have longer runs at #1 in 1994, Billboard will rank The Sign as the year’s #1 album.

Perspective From the Present: At some point in June of 1994, I got a part-time radio job at KRVR in Davenport, Iowa, the station that had fired me in 1990. Although it was staffed by then with several brand-name jocks who’d been in the market a long time, it was not an especially good station, largely btecause A) adult contemporary music at that moment was pretty terrible and B) the station was running a very soft, very white version of the format. It privileged bland records by rock stars (such as Springsteen’s “Streets of Philadelphia”) and beat-free AC sludge (epitomized by the inexplicable, 15-years-out-of-date success of “Beautiful in My Eyes” by Joshua Kadison). In 1995, KRVR would change format to classic rock. All the full-timers would get fired, but we part-timers did not.

If you watched The John Larroquette Show, chances are good you haven’t forgotten it. The former Night Court star played the recovering-alcoholic manager of a bus station in St. Louis, and it was, at least during the first season that wrapped in the spring of 1994, one of the darkest (and best) comedies ever on television. It’s never been released on DVD and isn’t on an official streaming site, but some episodes are available at YouTube.

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4 thoughts on “June 14, 1994: Questioning

  1. A 24-year-old Houston man visits his recently-revealed adoptive parents for lunch. He learns of the Simpson/Brown murders upon arrival at their house; Mancini’s death—salt in the wounds brought on by our hero’s ongoing personal upheaval—is mentioned over the main course. The Top 40 landscape (Springsteen aside) provides little solace, and the records he takes to heart at the time only evoke the period (and its ghosts) in later years.

    (Hey, you chose the date…)

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  2. “The John Larroquette Show” was a brilliant comedy on NBC and I loved every minute of it. In the first episode, a sign in John’s office at the bus station in St. Louis reads, “This is a dark ride.” When asked about it, Larroquette replies, “It’s a message that should be posted at the birth canal.”

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  3. Memorable. June 14, 1994 was a great day if you work for/listen to new radio station WOGB (Oldies of Green Bay) 103.1fm. Simulcast with Mid-West Family Oldies WVBO (Valley’s Best Oldies) 103.9fm Oshkosh. Super jocks Rich Allen, Earl Brooker, Mark Allen, Rob Schneider; Louie “The Cool Cat” 20 foot tall inflatible mascot, 1957 Cadillac Fleetwood grand prize giveaway. A salesman’s dream gig, Highway 41 revisit every day.

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