February 18, 1965: I’ve Got Five Dollars

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(Pictured: the cast of My Three Sons, 1965.)

February 18, 1965, was a Thursday. In Marion, Alabama, civil rights marchers protesting the arrest of one of their number clash with a crowd that includes state troopers, auxiliary police, and private citizens. Protester Jimmie Lee Jackson is shot inside a restaurant while trying to protect his mother. He will die on February 26. Jackson’s death helps to inspire the Selma-to-Montgomery march later in the year. Among those injured is NBC News correspondent Richard Valeriani, who’s hit with an axe handle. Defense secretary Robert MacNamara testifies before the House Armed Services Committee, and he says that the United States has little choice but to continue defending Southeast Asia from Communist aggression. He says the situation in South Vietnam is “grave but by no means hopeless.” Early this morning, NASA’s Ranger 8 spacecraft makes a midcourse correction on its way to the moon. On Saturday, it is scheduled to spend just under 14 minutes taking and sending back over 4,000 pictures of a potential landing site for a manned mission to the moon. It will then crash into the surface at 5,800 miles per hour. In Rome, an archaeologist claims that she has discovered the tomb of the Apostle Peter. After 68 years as a British colony in Africa, the Gambia becomes an independent country.

Many retailers are planning Washington’s Birthday sales for the coming weekend and Monday. At South Shore Mall in Bayshore, New York, shoppers can register to win one of 22 AKC-registered beagle puppies to be given away on Monday. Elsewhere on Long Island, in Farmingdale, a local meat market offers smoked hams for 49 cents a pound, prime rib for 59 cents a pound, and top sirloin roast for 79 cents a pound. At McDonalds in Ann Arbor, Michigan, hamburgers are 15 cents, triple-thick shakes 23 cents, and the Filet-o-Fish sandwich is 24 cents.

Activist Malcolm X appears on a TV talk show in New York City with journalist Aubrey Barnette to discuss the nature of the Black Muslim movement. Three days later, just before a scheduled speech in Manhattan, Malcolm will be shot to death. Future rapper and producer Andre Young, who will be known professionally as Dr. Dre, is born. ABC’s TV lineup tonight includes Jonny Quest, The Donna Reed Show and My Three Sons; NBC’s offerings include Daniel Boone, Dr. Kildare, and Hazel; CBS airs The Munsters, Perry Mason (“The Case of the Lover’s Gamble”), Password, The Baileys of Balboa, and The Defenders, a critically acclaimed legal drama starring E. G. Marshall and Robert Reed. At Abbey Road Studios, the Beatles continue work on what will be the Help! soundtrack, including nine takes of “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” during an afternoon session. John Coltrane and his band continue a session at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The Who plays the London borough of Ealing. Elsewhere in London, Rod Stewart and the Soul Agents play the Marquee Club. The Beach Boys play Worcester, Massachusetts.

At WKY in Oklahoma City, Petula Clark holds the #1 spot on the new Top 50 again this week with “Downtown.” Shirley Bassey’s “Goldfinger” is #2, and “King of the Road” by Roger Miller is up to #3. Two versions of “Red Roses for a Blue Lady,” an instrumental by Bert Kaempfert and a vocal by Vic Dana, are new in the Top 10, sharing the #6 position. Also new in the Top 10: “The Birds and the Bees” by Jewel Akens and the Kinks with “All Day and All of the Night.” The Beatles are exploding up the chart with “Eight Days a Week” and “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party,” up from #48 last week to #12 this week. Also making a gigantic leap is the double-sided Gerry and the Pacemakers hit “Ferry Cross the Mersey” and “Pretend,” which went from #43 to #14, and “Midnight Special” by Johnny Rivers is up to #19 from #46 one week ago. Eleven songs are new among the Top 50. They include “Shotgun” by Jr. Walker and the All-Stars, “People Get Ready” by the Impressions, and “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” by the Animals. The highest debut, however, belongs to George Jones and Gene Pitney. Their song “I’ve Got Five Dollars and It’s Saturday Night” comes on all the way up at #21.

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