March 13, 1974: There Won’t Be Anymore

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(Pictured: Blue Swede.)

March 13, 1974, was a Wednesday. King Hussein of Jordan is in the United States. Vice President Ford hosted a state dinner in his honor at the White House last night; today, the king and his prime minister meet privately with Ford. A plane carrying the cast and crew of the documentary TV series Primal Man crashes in California, killing 36 people including actor/stunt man Janos Prohaska, who is best-known for playing animals and monsters. He had a recurring role as Cookie the Bear on The Andy Williams Show and was also seen as a gorilla on Gilligan’s Island. Future professional tennis player Thomas Enqvist is born.

In today’s Doonesbury strip, journalist Roland B. Hedley tells Mike and Zonker who they are. On TV tonight, NBC opens with an episode of Adam-12, followed by the TV movie The Execution of Private Slovik, starring Martin Sheen as the only American soldier to be shot for desertion since the Civil War, in 1945. ABC carries an episode of The Cowboys followed by the TV movie The Hanged Man, a western starring Steve Forrest. CBS airs We Live With Elephants, a documentary following a Scottish scientist and his family who spent five years studying a herd of 500 elephants in Tanzania. It’s followed by episodes of Cannon and Kojak. After the late local news, Don Rickles sits in for Johnny with guests Jack Klugman and Charo. ABC’s Wide World of Entertainment presents Honeymoon Suite, which stars comedian Alan King in a set of stories all taking place in the same suite of a hotel. The CBS Late Movie is Gun Glory, a 1957 western starring Stewart Granger and Rhonda Fleming.

Late last night or early this morning, John Lennon and Harry Nilsson were kicked out of the Troubadour in Los Angeles after drunkenly heckling the Smothers Brothers, who were performing. Troubadour staffers also claim Lennon punched a waitress and kicked a valet. It’s not the first time Lennon has caused a scene at the Troubadour. Fans in Hamburg, Pennsylvania, attend a show supposedly starring Fleetwood Mac. However, it’s actually a band of entirely different musicians assembled by Fleetwood Mac’s manager, Clifford Davis. Davis tells Rolling Stone, “I want to get this out of the public’s mind as far as the band being Mick Fleetwood’s band. . . . I’ve always been sort of the leader. I’ve always sort of picked who was going to be in it and who wasn’t.” He claims Fleetwood was supposed to be the drummer on this tour, but dropped out at the last minute. Bob Welch denies the entire Davis story, and says he, Fleetwood, John and Christine McVie, and guitarist Bob Weston will meet with lawyers to sort things out. Elvis Presley plays Greensboro, North Carolina, and Jackson Browne plays Worcester, Massachusetts. Barry Manilow plays Philadelphia, and Deep Purple plays Madison Square Garden in New York. Jimmy Buffett plays Nashville, and Humble Pie plays Buffalo with Spooky Tooth and Montrose.

At WAKY in Louisville, “Hooked on a Feeling” by Blue Swede leaps from #10 to #1 on the new music survey. Last week’s #1, “Seasons in the Sun” by Terry Jacks, slips to #2. “Looking for a Love” by Bobby Womack and “Bennie and the Jets” by Elton John are new in the Top 10. The hottest song on the survey is “T.S.O.P” by MFSB, up to #15 from #30 last week. Also making a big move is “Dark Lady” by Cher, up eight spots to #11. Charlie Rich has two hits among the Top 30: “A Very Special Love Song” at #4 and “There Won’t Be Anymore,” on its way out of the survey at #25. Two songs are new on the chart: “Mighty Love” by the Spinners and “Would You Lay With Me (In a Field of Stone)” by Tanya Tucker. WAKY’s Big Track Albums this week are Tales From Topographic Oceans by Yes, Piano Man by Billy Joel, High on the Hog by Black Oak Arkansas, and Bob Dylan’s Planet Waves.

Tonight, a Wisconsin eighth-grader watches The Execution of Private Slovik. Afterward, he goes off to bed, probably with the radio on for a little while before the light goes out.

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March 5, 1971: Another Day

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(Pictured: Margaret and Pierre Trudeau, 1971.)

March 5, 1971, was a Friday. Eastern Canada is digging out after an historic blizzard. Montreal received 17 inches of snow yesterday alone, setting a record that will stand until 2012. It is revealed today that Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau married Margaret Sinclair, the daughter of another prominent Canadian politician, in a secret ceremony yesterday in North Vancouver, British Columbia. He’s 51 years old; she’s 22. On Christmas Day, they’ll welcome a son and name him Justin. Hockey pioneer Punch Broadbent, who played for the Ottawa Senators, Montreal Maroons, and New York Americans between 1912 and 1929, dies at age 78. Future major league baseball players Brian Hunter, Jeffrey Hammonds, and Chad Fonville are born.

In Oakland, California, the Black Panther Party holds a Revolutionary Intercommunal Solidarity Day event honoring imprisoned Panthers co-founder Bobby Seale, controversial activist Angela Davis, and others. The event is also billed as a “Post-Birthday Celebration for Huey P. Newton,” recently released from prison. The program features “revolutionary singing by the Lumpen of the Black Panther Party backed by the Freedom Messengers,” plus music by the Vanguards and the Grateful Dead. As the Dead perform, the front of the hall is occupied by hippies, while the Panthers, who are less friendly to the Dead than the Dead are to them, stand in the back. Across the bay in San Francisco, Aretha Franklin opens a three-night stand at the Fillmore West. She is the first female performer to headline the Fillmore. Highlights of the shows will be released in May on Aretha Live at Fillmore West.

Ted Nugent and the Amboy Dukes play Des Moines with Mason Profitt, Badfinger plays Toledo, and Three Dog Night headlines Madison Square Garden in New York City with Stevie Wonder and Bloodrock. The Rolling Stones play Manchester Free Trade Hall in the UK. Led Zeppelin opens a spring tour of the UK at Ulster Hall in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Their setlist includes the first public performances of several new songs, “Black Dog,” “Rock and Roll,” “Going to California,” and “Stairway to Heaven,” all of which will be on the album the band is currently recording.

Six games are on the NBA schedule. The league-leading Milwaukee Bucks get 34 points from Oscar Robertson and 26 from Jon McGlocklin to beat the Detroit Pistons 108-95. Dave Bing of the Pistons leads all scorers with 39. Five games are played in the American Basketball Association tonight, including a triple-overtime barnburner between the league’s two worst teams, in which the Texas Chaparrals beat the Denver Rockets 158-153. On TV tonight, ABC presents The Brady Bunch, Nanny and the Professor, The Partridge Family, That Girl, The Odd Couple, and Love American Style. CBS primetime features episodes of The Interns and The New Andy Griffith Show plus the 1968 theatrical movie The Biggest Bundle of Them All starring Robert Wagner and Raquel Welch. NBC airs episodes of The High Chaparral, The Name of the Game, and The Strange Report, a British import about a freelance criminologist starring Anthony Quayle. In the Poughkeepsie Journal, Vassar College student Meryl Streep gets a positive notice for her performance in the Vassar Experimental Theater production of the 1731 play The London Merchant by George Lillo.

At KJR in Seattle, “Timothy” by the Buoys is #1 on the new Fabulous Fifty survey. “Doesn’t Somebody Want to Be Wanted” by the Partridge Family is #2, followed by Tom Jones’ “She’s a Lady,” “Me and Bobby McGee” by Janis Joplin, and the Osmonds’ “One Bad Apple.” New entries in the Top 10 are “Woodstock” by Matthews’ Southern Comfort and “Chick-a-Boom” by Daddy Dewdrop. The hottest records on the chart include “Another Day” by Paul McCartney, up 15 spots to #19; “Stay Awhile” by the Bells, up 14 to #34, and “What Is Life” by George Harrison, up 13 to #19. Harrison’s double-sided hit “My Sweet Lord” and “Isn’t It a Pity” is still on the KJR chart as well, at #36. The highest debut on the chart is “Hot Pants,” a novelty record by Salvage, at #40. Also debuting this week is the new song by Three Dog Night, “Joy to the World.”

(Note to Patrons: the recent poll about what you’d like to read here showed overwhelming interest in the 70s, some interest in the 60s and earlier, less interest in the 80s than I expected, and no votes at all for posts covering dates in the 90s or the new millennium. Since that largely reflects my own interests, I think we’ll probably carry on as we’ve been doing. If there’s a particular date you’d like to read about, send it along no less than a couple of weeks out and I’ll fulfill your request.)

February 26, 1973: Deliverance

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(Pictured: released American POWs get a red-carpet welcome at an American base in the Phillippines on February 12, 1973.)

February 26, 1973, is a Monday. President Nixon’s reelection committee files a lawsuit against the Washington Post, New York Times, Washington Star-News, and Time magazine demanding they reveal notes and sources of their reporting on the Watergate investigation. Those subpoenaed include Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein and Post publisher Katherine Graham. NBC and CBS lead their newscasts tonight with news from Vietnam, where a peace agreement was signed last month. They also cover the ongoing return of released prisoners of war to the United States. ABC leads with economic news before getting to the Vietnam stories. The White House is preparing for confirmation hearings for FBI director-designate L. Patrick Gray, which will begin on Wednesday. Gray has been acting director since the death of J. Edgar Hoover in May 1972. Gray will fail to win Senate confirmation to the permanent post, and will resign as acting director in April after he admits to destroying certain documents relating to national security at the request of Nixon aides John Dean and John Ehrlichman. At Cape Kennedy in Florida, NASA rolls out the Saturn 1B rocket that will launch the first Skylab crew into space in May.

On primetime TV tonight, NBC airs Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In, which features guest stars Johnny Carson, Sandy Duncan, Arthur Godfrey, and Charlie Callas. NBC follows Laugh-In with a TV movie called The Stranger, about an astronaut who crashes on a previously unknown planet that is a twin of the earth. ABC presents an episode of The Rookies in which two of the young cops are detailed to a different precinct to help solve a murder. CBS shows tonight include Gunsmoke, The Lucy Show, and The Doris Day Show. Later tonight, Johnny Carson’s guests include David Brenner, Ross Martin, and Paul Williams.

Future football star Marshall Faulk is born. On a pro wrestling card at Madison Square Garden in New York, Verne Gagne defends his AWA world heavyweight championship by defeating Eddie Graham. The New York Times publishes a review of a new musical by Stephen Sondheim, A Little Night Music, which opened at the Shubert Theater on Broadway last night. The Grateful Dead play Lincoln, Nebraska, and Frank Zappa plays Atlanta. Black Sabbath plays Munich, Germany, and Bruce Springsteen plays the Troubadour in Los Angeles. Barry Manilow plays Massey Hall in Toronto. Neil Young plays Kansas City, Missouri, and the Rolling Stones play Sydney, Australia.

At WAMS in Wilmington, Delaware, “Love Train” by the O’Jays and “Last Song” by Edward Bear hold at #1 and #2 on the station’s new survey. Roberta Flack’s “Killing Me Softly,” “Space Oddity” by David Bowie, and “Lucky Man” by Emerson Lake and Palmer round out the Top Five. New songs in the Top 10 include “Dueling Banjos” from the Deliverance soundtrack and “Don’t Cross the River” by America. They bump “Hi Hi Hi” by Wings and “Don’t Expect Me to Be Your Friend” by Lobo. “Dueling Banjos” is the week’s biggest mover, but “Ain’t No Woman Like the One I’ve Got” by the Four Tops is hot, too. Debuts on the singles chart include “Give Me Your Love” by Barbara Mason and “Teacher I Need You,” a cut from Elton John’s album Don’t Shoot Me I’m Only the Piano Player. The latter is one of five albums the station lists on its survey, unranked. The others are More Hot Rocks by the Rolling Stones, the Beach Boys’ Holland, Shootout at the Fantasy Factory by Traffic, and the self-titled album by Stealers Wheel.

In Wisconsin, a boy soon to turn 13 looks forward to his birthday. A couple of friends will come to his house and stay overnight to celebrate; they’ll watch monster movies on TV, talk about sports, and listen to the radio.

February 18, 1965: I’ve Got Five Dollars

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(Pictured: the cast of My Three Sons, 1965.)

February 18, 1965, was a Thursday. In Marion, Alabama, civil rights marchers protesting the arrest of one of their number clash with a crowd that includes state troopers, auxiliary police, and private citizens. Protester Jimmie Lee Jackson is shot inside a restaurant while trying to protect his mother. He will die on February 26. Jackson’s death helps to inspire the Selma-to-Montgomery march later in the year. Among those injured is NBC News correspondent Richard Valeriani, who’s hit with an axe handle. Defense secretary Robert MacNamara testifies before the House Armed Services Committee, and he says that the United States has little choice but to continue defending Southeast Asia from Communist aggression. He says the situation in South Vietnam is “grave but by no means hopeless.” Early this morning, NASA’s Ranger 8 spacecraft makes a midcourse correction on its way to the moon. On Saturday, it is scheduled to spend just under 14 minutes taking and sending back over 4,000 pictures of a potential landing site for a manned mission to the moon. It will then crash into the surface at 5,800 miles per hour. In Rome, an archaeologist claims that she has discovered the tomb of the Apostle Peter. After 68 years as a British colony in Africa, the Gambia becomes an independent country.

Many retailers are planning Washington’s Birthday sales for the coming weekend and Monday. At South Shore Mall in Bayshore, New York, shoppers can register to win one of 22 AKC-registered beagle puppies to be given away on Monday. Elsewhere on Long Island, in Farmingdale, a local meat market offers smoked hams for 49 cents a pound, prime rib for 59 cents a pound, and top sirloin roast for 79 cents a pound. At McDonalds in Ann Arbor, Michigan, hamburgers are 15 cents, triple-thick shakes 23 cents, and the Filet-o-Fish sandwich is 24 cents.

Activist Malcolm X appears on a TV talk show in New York City with journalist Aubrey Barnette to discuss the nature of the Black Muslim movement. Three days later, just before a scheduled speech in Manhattan, Malcolm will be shot to death. Future rapper and producer Andre Young, who will be known professionally as Dr. Dre, is born. ABC’s TV lineup tonight includes Jonny Quest, The Donna Reed Show and My Three Sons; NBC’s offerings include Daniel Boone, Dr. Kildare, and Hazel; CBS airs The Munsters, Perry Mason (“The Case of the Lover’s Gamble”), Password, The Baileys of Balboa, and The Defenders, a critically acclaimed legal drama starring E. G. Marshall and Robert Reed. At Abbey Road Studios, the Beatles continue work on what will be the Help! soundtrack, including nine takes of “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” during an afternoon session. John Coltrane and his band continue a session at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The Who plays the London borough of Ealing. Elsewhere in London, Rod Stewart and the Soul Agents play the Marquee Club. The Beach Boys play Worcester, Massachusetts.

At WKY in Oklahoma City, Petula Clark holds the #1 spot on the new Top 50 again this week with “Downtown.” Shirley Bassey’s “Goldfinger” is #2, and “King of the Road” by Roger Miller is up to #3. Two versions of “Red Roses for a Blue Lady,” an instrumental by Bert Kaempfert and a vocal by Vic Dana, are new in the Top 10, sharing the #6 position. Also new in the Top 10: “The Birds and the Bees” by Jewel Akens and the Kinks with “All Day and All of the Night.” The Beatles are exploding up the chart with “Eight Days a Week” and “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party,” up from #48 last week to #12 this week. Also making a gigantic leap is the double-sided Gerry and the Pacemakers hit “Ferry Cross the Mersey” and “Pretend,” which went from #43 to #14, and “Midnight Special” by Johnny Rivers is up to #19 from #46 one week ago. Eleven songs are new among the Top 50. They include “Shotgun” by Jr. Walker and the All-Stars, “People Get Ready” by the Impressions, and “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” by the Animals. The highest debut, however, belongs to George Jones and Gene Pitney. Their song “I’ve Got Five Dollars and It’s Saturday Night” comes on all the way up at #21.

Reader Feedback Requested: I’m interested in days as far back in time as this one, but are you? Please respond in the poll below and tell me what you’d most like to read about here.

February 12, 1982: The First Big Thing

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(Pictured: Katharine Hepburn and Henry Fonda in On Golden Pond.)

February 12, 1982, was a Friday. This year’s Academy Award nominations were announced yesterday. Reds is up for 12 Oscars including Best Picture. On Golden Pond, the current weekly box-office champ, received 10 nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Henry Fonda, Best Actress for Katharine Hepburn, and Best Supporting Actress for Jane Fonda. The other Best Picture nominees are Chariots of Fire, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and Atlantic City. Today, as he leaves the White House for the long Presidents Day weekend at Camp David, President Reagan answers questions from reporters about whether American military advisors in El Salvador are carrying rifles, which would be against policy. Senators opposed to American actions in Central America are considering whether to invoke the War Powers Act and to require Reagan to get Congressional approval for them. (The El Salvador story leads network newscasts tonight.) Reagan also reiterates his insistence on budget cuts in the new fiscal year. On a pilgrimage to Africa, Pope John Paul II visits Lagos, Nigeria.

A double-elimination women’s basketball tournament involving Big Ten schools opens today in East Lansing, Michigan. The league will not officially sponsor any women’s sports until this fall; Big Ten schools compete as independents or as members of other women’s leagues. Ohio State will win the tournament championship. The Daytona 500 will be run on Sunday. Today, Tim Richmond passes Slick Johnson on the last lap to win a 30-lap consolation race at the speedway and a purse of $4,450.

On TV tonight, CBS airs first-run episodes of its popular Friday-night lineup: The Dukes of Hazzard, Dallas, and Falcon Crest. ABC opens its night with Benson, followed by sitcoms Open All Night (about an oddball family running a convenience store), Best of the West (an Old West spoof), and It’s a Living (starring Ann Jillian), before wrapping up the night with an episode of the police drama Strike Force starring Robert Stack. NBC starts with the news show NBC Magazine and follows with episodes of McClain’s Law, starring James Arness, and Cassie and Co., starring Angie Dickinson. NBC announced today that Cassie and Co. will be yanked from the schedule after next Friday’s broadcast. Also getting the axe from NBC today: the limited-run Billy Crystal Comedy Hour and Harper Valley, a sitcom starring Barbara Eden.

In Lincoln, Nebraska, stereo shoppers at the Electronics Center can save on receivers, turntables, and speakers, including Cerwin-Vega U-123s. A newspaper ad says of the speakers, “Meet the lease-breaker!” Depeche Mode plays Cardiff, Wales, the Police play the Cow Palace in San Francisco, and Alice Cooper plays Birmingham, England. Ozzy Osbourne and UFO play Cincinnati, and Prince plays Santa Monica, California. Dan Fogelberg plays Houston. On the new Cash Box magazine chart coming out tomorrow, the top three songs are in the same positions for the third week in a row: “Centerfold” by the J. Geils Band at #1, “I Can’t Go for That” by Hall and Oates at #2, and “Physical” by Olivia Newton-John at #3. “Sweet Dreams” by Air Supply and “Leader of the Band” by Dan Fogelberg are new in the Top 10. The biggest move within the Cash Box Top 40 is made by Buckner and Garcia’s “Pac Man Fever,” up 10 spots to #29; Stevie Wonder’s “That Girl” is up nine spots, from #21 to #12. On the Billboard 200 album chart, Freeze-Frame by the J. Geils Band is in its second week at #1. Filling out the Top 5: Journey’s Escape, IV by Foreigner, Hooked on Classics by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, and Private Eyes by Hall and Oates. The highest-debuting album is The First Family Rides Again, a Reagan parody starring Rich Little, at #95.

Perspective From the Present: On this day, I was wrapping up the second week of my full-time radio career, on the air weekdays from 1 to 6 on KDTH in Dubuque. It was also my second week in a new apartment. But those would not be all of life’s big changes in this week. On this night, my girlfriend would be coming over. I don’t remember if we went out for dinner or stayed in, but I do remember that I gave her an engagement ring. I had planned to save it for Valentine’s Day on Sunday, but I couldn’t wait. It was the first big thing I’d bought with my princely new radio salary of $180 a week.

(I’m pleased to see that the Cash Box Archives are back online. The pop charts are up now, and country and R&B charts are supposed to be coming soon. Also: for more about the music of this week in 1982, visit good brother HERC here.)

February 4, 1975: Be Not Proud

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(Pictured: President Ford roughhouses with his new golden retriever, Liberty, on February 2, 1975.)

February 4, 1975, was a Tuesday. Headlines this morning include President Ford’s budget for fiscal year 1976, which was released yesterday. Despite drastic curbs on goverment spending, the budget runs the largest peacetime deficit in history. Democratic leaders in Congress say they have no intention of going along with cuts to popular spending programs. Today, Ford is in Atlanta to give a speech, and he also holds an afternoon press conference. The majority of the questions involve what can be done to boost the weak American economy. Ford is also asked about a report that Republican senator Howard Baker is considering a run for the 1976 Republican presidential nomination, and whether Ford will run for a full term. He says it is his intention to do so, and that other people may run if they choose. In a political upset, Margaret Thatcher is elected leader of Britain’s Conservative Party, defeating former prime minister Edward Heath in an election he called and was expected to win. For the last several weeks, officials in China have recommended the evacuation of people from Liaoning province, believing that an earthquake is imminent. Early this evening, a magnitude 7.3 earthquake strikes the city of Haicheng, killing 2,000 and injuring over 27,000. Later estimates will claim that the number of dead and injured could have been 150,000 without the warnings. Jump blues artist Louis Jordan dies at age 66. Future singer Natalie Imbruglia is born. In Ann Arbor, Michigan, you can buy a half-gallon of milk at VIP Discount Center for 66 cents or three packs of cigarettes for $1.28 with no limits.

On TV tonight, CBS airs Good Times, M*A*S*H, Hawaii Five-O, and Barnaby Jones. ABC counters with the TV movie premiere Death Be Not Proud starring Arthur Hill, Jane Alexander, and Robby Benson, followed by Marcus Welby, MD. NBC’s lineup includes Adam-12, a Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation of All Creatures Great and Small starring Michael Caine, and an episode of Police Story. Later tonight, Johnny Carson’s guests include Fernando Lamas, Susan Sarandon, and singer Roger Miller.

Genesis plays Chicago and Lynryd Skynyrd plays Rochester, New York. Led Zeppelin plays on Long Island. When Zeppelin’s 1975 American tour was announced, the band had a date in Boston scheduled for tonight. Tickets were to go on sale at 10AM on January 7. On the night of the 6th, officials at Boston Garden opened the doors at 11PM so those in line for tickets could wait inside. A riot ensued, doing up to $75,000 in damage to the arena. To pacify the crowd, the Garden began selling tickets at 2:30AM—but when it became clear that some of the same people who had rioted now had tickets to the February 4 show, city officials feared a repeat of the violence and canceled it.

At KHJ in Los Angeles, “Please Mr. Postman” by the Carpenters goes to #1. Last week’s #1, “Laughter in the Rain” by Neil Sedaka, falls all the way to #13. The rest of the KHJ Top Five: “Mandy” by Barry Manilow, “Best of My Love” by the Eagles, “Pick Up the Pieces” by AWB, and the Ohio Players’ “Fire.” Two songs are new in the Top 10: “Black Water” by the Doobie Brothers and “One Man Woman, One Woman Man” by Paul Anka. Three new songs debut on the station’s survey: “#9 Dream” by John Lennon, “The No-No Song” by Ringo Starr, and “Lovin’ You” by Minnie Riperton. The oldest song on the survey is “When Will I See You Again” by the Three Degrees, which is still at #20 in its 20th week on the chart. The new #1 album in Los Angeles is Linda Ronstadt’s Heart Like a Wheel, which knocks Elton John’s Greatest Hits to #2. Elton’s 1969 debut album, Empty Sky, reissued last month, is up to #11. The hottest album on the KHJ chart is Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks, which jumps to #7 from #20.

Perspective From the Present: I had just started the second semester of my freshman year in high school, and I was taking a course called Personal Typing. I expect I would have learned how to type eventually, even if it was some sort of do-it-yourself hunt-and-peck method. But I am not sure that I would have become the writer I am today if it wasn’t for the speed of touch-typing, which allowed the words to hit the page almost as fast as I thought them up, and still does.

I had begun to notice a girl in typing class, and after asking around, it turned out that she had noticed me, too. And on Valentine’s Day, we verified our mutual attraction.

January 31, 1994: Below Zero

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(Pictured: Dallas Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman celebrates victory in Super Bowl XXVIII.)

January 31, 1994, was a Monday. It is extremely cold in much of the United States. Nighttime temperatures have been in the 20s and 30s below zero from the upper Mississippi Valley to northern New England, and sub-freezing temperatures have been recorded in the Gulf Coast states. The countdown begins today for Thursday’s launch of the space shuttle Discovery. It will be the first shuttle mission with a Russian cosmonaut aboard, and the first joint U.S-Russian space mission since the Apollo/Soyuz flights in 1975. Secretary of State Warren Christopher says the United States supports a UN proposal for air strikes in Bosnia to punish Serbian guerillas who are holding an airport in Tuzla and refusing to allow Canadian troops in Srebrenica to be rotated home. The lawyer for figure skater Tonya Harding’s ex-husband, Jeff Gilooly, says Harding helped plan the attack on rival Nancy Kerrigan earlier this month. Harding has said she became aware of the attack plot only after it happened. The Los Angeles Times publishes an extensive series of articles about the aftermath of the Northridge earthquake, which hit southern California two weeks ago today. Fifty-seven people died and thousands were injured. The Times also headlines a report about the Arkansas land deal known as Whitewater, which has threatened to ensnare President and Mrs. Clinton in scandal. Novelist Pierre Boulle, who wrote several novels including Planet of the Apes and Bridge Over the River Kwai, dies at age 71.

Yesterday in Atlanta, the Dallas Cowboys defeated the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXVIII by a score of 30 to 13. It was the fourth straight Super Bowl defeat for the Bills and the second consecutive championship for the Cowboys. The halftime show featured country stars Clint Black, Tanya Tucker, Travis Tritt, and the Judds. Tonight in the NBA, Dominique Wilkins of the Atlanta Hawks becomes the 11th player to score 24,000 points in a career, getting 24 points to help the Hawks beat Dallas, 90-85. The win pulls the Hawks into a flat-footed tie with the idle New York Knicks for the best record in the Eastern Conference. Both have marks of 30-and-11. Duke is the new #1 in the AP men’s college basketball poll. It’s the fifth straight poll with a different #1 team. Last week’s #1, UCLA, lost to California yesterday.

The top movies at the box office this past weekend were Mrs. Doubtfire, Philadelphia, and Grumpy Old Men. On TV tonight, ABC starts the night with the newsmagazine show Day One, followed by the TV movie Lies of the Heart: The Story of Laurie Kellogg, a fact-based tale about a woman who contracts the murder of her abusive husband, starring Jennie Garth and Gregory Harrison. NBC airs The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Blossom, and an episode of The Cosby Mysteries. On CBS, it’s Evening Shade, Dave’s World, Murphy Brown, Love and War (a sitcom created by Murphy Brown creator Diane English and starring Annie Potts and Jay Thomas), and Northern Exposure. Fox devotes all of its primetime to a repeat of the theatrical movie Working Girl starring Melanie Griffith. Rush plays Las Cruces, New Mexico; Janet Jackson plays Philadelphia; Fairport Convention plays Yeovil in the UK. INXS plays Brisbane, Australia, and Bryan Adams plays Sydney.

Bryan Adams is atop the Billboard Hot 100 again this week with “All for Love,” his hit with Rod Stewart and Sting. Holding this week at #2 and #3 are “Hero” by Mariah Carey and “Breathe Again” by Toni Braxton. Celine Dion’s “The Power of Love” moves from #10 to #4. Two songs make monster debuts: “Whatta Man” by Salt ‘n’ Pepa with En Vogue is new in the Top 40 at #22, zooming in from #69 the week before; Janet Jackson’s “Because of You” is at #29 in its first week on the Hot 100. On the Billboard 200 album chart, Music Box by Mariah Carey is in its sixth week at #1; Doggy Style by Snoop Doggy Dogg is #2. Greatest Hits by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is #5; Vs. by Pearl Jam is #7; the highest debut is Antenna by ZZ Top at #14.

Perspective From the Present: My radio career had ended with a thud on the first working day of January. I had since found a job teaching prep classes for high-school students getting ready to take their ACTs, and by the end of January, I was on the road. My first trip was a bizarre week in Oklahoma City; in all the teaching trips I’ve taken over all the years since, I never had a weirder one—but that story will have to wait.

January 24, 1984: That’s All

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(Pictured: the original Apple Macintosh.)

January 24, 1984, was a Tuesday. Two days after it was introduced with a memorable TV commercial during the Super Bowl (a game in which the the Oakland Los Angeles Raiders blew out the Washington Redskins 38-9), Steve Jobs of Apple unveils the new Macintosh personal computer. Headlines on the morning papers include President Reagan’s nomination yesterday of White House councilor Ed Meese to be attorney general, replacing William French Smith. Today, Reagan arrives in the Oval Office a little after 9AM and spends the morning in a national security briefing. He travels to the Capitol for lunch with Republican senators and then returns to the White House, wrapping up his working day by 3:00. With less than four weeks to go before the Iowa caucuses, Democratic presidential candidates George McGovern, Alan Cranston, and Reubin Askew are among those criss-crossing the state. The price of gold falls 10 cents today, to $365.10 per ounce. Silver is down 28 cents to $7.98 per ounce. Tonight, the Washington Press Club hosts its annual Salute Congress dinner featuring lighthearted banter between reporters and members of Congress.

Eleven games are played in the NBA tonight, with 22 of the league’s 23 teams in action. The league-leading Boston Celtics beat Cleveland 118-97 behind 24 points from Larry Bird. The Philadelphia 76ers have the league’s second-best record, even after a 111-102 loss to the Knicks in New York. The best game of the night is in Washington, where the last-place Bullets beat the division-leading Milwaukee Bucks 123-117 in double overtime. Four games are played in the National Hockey League tonight, including a wild 7-7 tie between the Hartford Whalers and the Canadiens in Montreal. Future major league baseball player Scott Kazmir is born. ABC’s TV lineup tonight starts with Foul-Ups, Bleeps and Blunders, followed by Happy Days, Three’s Company, Oh Madeline starring Madeline Kahn, and Hart to Hart. CBS airs an episode of The Mississippi, which stars Ralph Waite as a lawyer practicing from a boat on the Mississippi River, and the TV movie The Lost Honor of Kathryn Beck, a thriller starring Marlo Thomas and Kris Kristofferson. NBC’s lineup includes repeats of The A-Team and a two-hour Remington Steele.

Def Leppard plays Tokyo and the Clash plays Long Beach, California. Robert Plant plays Melbourne, Australia, Genesis plays Austin, Texas, and Van Halen plays Little Rock, Arkansas. Genesis (“That’s All”) and Van Halen (“Jump”) are new in the Top 10 at KRTH in Los Angeles, where “Owner of a Lonely Heart” by Yes holds at #1 and “Let the Music Play” by Shannon is #2. “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” by Cyndi Lauper takes a mighty leap from #13 to #3 this week. Also charted at K-Earth: the Pretenders’ “Middle of the Road,” Elton John’s “I Guess That’s Why They Call it the Blues,” “Wrapped Around Your Finger” by the Police, Michael Jackson’s “Thriller,” “An Innocent Man” by Billy Joel, and “Let’s Pretend We’re Married” by Prince. Debuts on the station’s Top 30 include “I Want a New Drug” by Huey Lewis and the News, “Let’s Stay Together” by Tina Turner, Christine McVie’s “Got a Hold on Me” and “Somebody’s Watching Me” by Rockwell.

Perspective From the Present: On this day, The Mrs. and I were living in our little one-bedroom basement apartment in small-town Illinois. We’d received a microwave oven as a wedding present the previous year, and for the Super Bowl in January 1984, I whipped up a batch of chili in it. Super Bowl chili of some sort, made in the microwave or some other way, became a tradition with us; I have made it for every Super Bowl since. The streak will end this year, however, after 35 Super Bowls in a row, because I will be traveling on gameday (Sunday, February 3) and unable to cook. I could make some on Saturday, I guess, but it won’t be quite the same.

January 15, 1991: In the Heat of the Night

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(Pictured: An American family watches war news from the Persian Gulf.)

January 15, 1991, was a Tuesday. Today, Iraq fails to meet a UN-mandated deadline for withdrawing 545,000 troops from Kuwait. They’re faced by over 800,000 international coalition forces, the majority of which are from the United States. Yesterday, UN Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar returned from meetings with Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein and told reporters he sees little hope that war in the Persian Gulf can be averted. Pope John Paul II sends Saddam a letter urging him to “take courageous steps which can be the beginning of a true journey towards peace.” A partial eclipse of the sun is visible in parts of Australia, New Zealand, and the South Pacific. In Texas, Democrat Ann Richards takes the oath of office as governor.

Today’s Dilbert strip features an appearance by Dan Quayle’s brain. ABC’s primetime lineup includes Who’s the Boss?, Head of the Class, Roseanne (which wins the ratings race for the night), Coach, and thirtysomething. CBS airs Rescue 911 and the theatrical movie The Presidio. NBC’s lineup includes Matlock, In the Heat of the Night, and Law and Order. At the movies Home Alone continues to dominate the box office along with Awakenings starring Robert DeNiro and Robin Williams. Pairings are set for the NFC and AFC championship games this weekend: the Los Angeles Raiders will play at Buffalo and the New York Giants will play at San Francisco. The NBA’s top team, the Boston Celtics, are 29-and-6 and have the night off. Among the eight games played tonight, the Portland Trail Blazers beat Minnesota 132-117, running their second-best record to 32-and-7. Clyde Drexler leads Portland with 32 points. The league’s third-best team, San Antonio, loses to Utah 124-102. The league’s worst team, the Denver Nuggets, drops to 7-and-29 after getting hammered by Seattle, 146-99.

A new version of John Lennon’s “Give Peace a Chance,” recorded with war in the Persian Gulf looming, is officially released. Lennon’s son Sean and Lenny Kravitz rewrote the original lyrics, which are sung by artists recording as the Peace Choir. They include Yoko Ono, Peter Gabriel, Bruce Hornsby, Al Jarreau, Cyndi Lauper, Little Richard, LL Cool J, MC Hammer, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt, Terence Trent D’Arby, Tom Petty, Adam Ant, and others. On the Billboard Hot 100, “Justify My Love” by Madonna is in its second week at #1. “Because I Love You” by Stevie B holds at #2. Only one song is new in the Top 10: “Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)” by C&C Music Factory. “I’m Your Baby Tonight” by Whitney Houston falls out of the Top 10. There’s practically no movement anywhere: Janet Jackson’s “Love Will Never Do (Without You)” and “I’m Not in Love” by Will to Power make the biggest jumps in the Top 20, three places each (#7 to #4 and #20 to #17 respectively). There’s only one new song in the Top 40: “Love Makes Things Happen” by Pebbles at #40. Only three new songs debut on the Hot 100; the highest is “Iesha” by Another Bad Creation at #78. AC/DC plays Portland, Oregon, Guns ‘n’ Roses plays Rio de Janeiro, and Anthrax plays Montreal.

Perspective From the Present: On this day, The Mrs. and I had a new arrival in the house. We had adopted Abby, our first cat, shortly after the holidays. For a while, we left the radio on and tuned to my station while we were gone so she would hear my voice throughout the day. Like most Americans, we went to bed on the night of the 15th figuring we’d be at war pretty soon, maybe before we got up Wednesday morning. That day, I went to work as usual, doing my afternoon show at the little station in Clinton, Iowa. The bombing started in the Gulf a little before 6:00 that night, and what had been called Operation Desert Shield turned into Operation Desert Storm. After I read the first couple of bulletins, we joined network news coverage and let it roll for the next 18 hours or so. Although there wasn’t much for me to do, I remember staying at the station until midnight, partly because we needed to have an operator there, but partly because I didn’t want to be anywhere else while history was being made.

January 7, 1983: What About Me

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(Pictured: Stevie Wonder appears at an event promoting the Martin Luther King holiday with Gil Scott-Heron, Jesse Jackson, and Gladys Knight.)

January 7, 1983, was a Friday. The ongoing weakness of the US economy is all over the news. Retailers are disappointed with December sales figures, although analysts disagree about the likely impact of the slow holiday season. New forecasts indicate the economy may grow at a rate of only 1.4 percent this year, down from last fall’s forecast of 3.1 percent. The administration is considering spending freezes to offset record deficits, but ecomomists fear that even if the economy begins growing again, deficits will remain a persistent problem. Unemployment remains high; the administration hopes the unemployment rate, currently 10.8 percent, can be cut to nine percent by the end of 1984. Yesterday, President Reagan signed a bill increasing the federal gas tax for the first time in 23 years. A report issued today by the Centers for Disease Control reports evidence that AIDS can be transmitted between heterosexuals; new research involving infected prison inmates also indicates that it can be spread through exposure to blood or blood products.

Future pro golfer Natalie Gulbis and future major leaguer Edwin Encarnacion are born. Four games are played in the National Hockey League tonight. The Edmonton Oilers get a hat trick from Glenn Anderson and two goals from Wayne Gretzky to beat Pittsburgh 7-2. Eight games are played in the NBA. The Philadelphia 76ers run their league-best record to 26-and-5 with a 106-89 win over the Washington Bullets. It’s the sixth straight win for the Sixers, who are led by Andrew Toney with 28 points. Julius Erving adds 23 and Moses Malone scores 22. The NFL playoffs begin this weekend with a special 16-team format necessitated by the players’ strike that reduced the regular season to nine games. Four games will be played tomorrow and four more on Sunday. The two top-seeded teams in what’s been dubbed the Super Bowl Tournament are the Los Angeles Raiders and Washington Redskins. Other top teams playing include Miami, Cincinnati, Dallas, Green Bay, Pittsburgh, and Minnesota.

Popular options for weekend moviegoers include Tootsie, 48 Hours, and The Verdict. On TV tonight, CBS wins the ratings race with its Friday-night lineup of The Dukes of Hazzard, Dallas, and Falcon Crest. ABC’s lineup includes Benson, The New Odd Couple (which stars Ron Glass of Barney Miller as Felix and Demond Wilson of Sanford and Son as Oscar), and an ABC News Closeup special about the massacre of Palestinians and Lebanese in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in Lebanon last September. NBC presents a two-hour episode of Knight Rider followed by Remington Steele. Later, Johnny Carson welcomes Jack Lemmon and Tanya Tucker, and Andy Kaufman brings his parents to an appearance on Late Night With David Letterman.

Yesterday, Stevie Wonder appeared at a Capitol Hill press conference to discuss ongoing efforts to make Martin Luther King’s birthday a national holiday. Tonight, Aerosmith continues its “Right in the Nuts” tour at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, and KISS plays Saginaw, Michigan. One of two competing editions of Badfinger, led by Tom Evans, plays Atlanta. (The other Badfinger is led by Evans’ former bandmate Joey Molland.) Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones plays and speaks at an educational event held at the Town Hall Theater in New York City.

At WLOL in Minneapolis, “You Can’t Hurry Love” by Phil Collins is the new #1 song, dropping “What About Me” by Moving Pictures to #3. “You Got Lucky” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is up to #2. “Baby Come to Me” by Patti Austin and James Ingram, “On the Loose” by Saga, and “Heart to Heart” by Kenny Loggins are new in the Top 10, replacing Men at Work’s “Down Under,” “Southern Cross” by Crosby Stills and Nash, and Toto’s “Africa.” Songs moving up outside the Top 10 include “Back on the Chain Gang” by the Pretenders, “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me” by Culture Club, “Beat It” by Michael Jackson, and “Hungry Like the Wolf” by Duran Duran.

Perspective From the Present: “What About Me,” which sounds as 80s as 80s can be, was an enormous hit in Australia during 1982, and would make #29 on the American Hot 100 in February 1983. The very same version would hit in America for a second time in 1989, peaking at #46. You don’t hear it on the radio anymore, but several other popular songs of the moment have never been off the air since.