February 18, 1965: I’ve Got Five Dollars

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(Pictured: the cast of My Three Sons, 1965.)

February 18, 1965, was a Thursday. In Marion, Alabama, civil rights marchers protesting the arrest of one of their number clash with a crowd that includes state troopers, auxiliary police, and private citizens. Protester Jimmie Lee Jackson is shot inside a restaurant while trying to protect his mother. He will die on February 26. Jackson’s death helps to inspire the Selma-to-Montgomery march later in the year. Among those injured is NBC News correspondent Richard Valeriani, who’s hit with an axe handle. Defense secretary Robert MacNamara testifies before the House Armed Services Committee, and he says that the United States has little choice but to continue defending Southeast Asia from Communist aggression. He says the situation in South Vietnam is “grave but by no means hopeless.” Early this morning, NASA’s Ranger 8 spacecraft makes a midcourse correction on its way to the moon. On Saturday, it is scheduled to spend just under 14 minutes taking and sending back over 4,000 pictures of a potential landing site for a manned mission to the moon. It will then crash into the surface at 5,800 miles per hour. In Rome, an archaeologist claims that she has discovered the tomb of the Apostle Peter. After 68 years as a British colony in Africa, the Gambia becomes an independent country.

Many retailers are planning Washington’s Birthday sales for the coming weekend and Monday. At South Shore Mall in Bayshore, New York, shoppers can register to win one of 22 AKC-registered beagle puppies to be given away on Monday. Elsewhere on Long Island, in Farmingdale, a local meat market offers smoked hams for 49 cents a pound, prime rib for 59 cents a pound, and top sirloin roast for 79 cents a pound. At McDonalds in Ann Arbor, Michigan, hamburgers are 15 cents, triple-thick shakes 23 cents, and the Filet-o-Fish sandwich is 24 cents.

Activist Malcolm X appears on a TV talk show in New York City with journalist Aubrey Barnette to discuss the nature of the Black Muslim movement. Three days later, just before a scheduled speech in Manhattan, Malcolm will be shot to death. Future rapper and producer Andre Young, who will be known professionally as Dr. Dre, is born. ABC’s TV lineup tonight includes Jonny Quest, The Donna Reed Show and My Three Sons; NBC’s offerings include Daniel Boone, Dr. Kildare, and Hazel; CBS airs The Munsters, Perry Mason (“The Case of the Lover’s Gamble”), Password, The Baileys of Balboa, and The Defenders, a critically acclaimed legal drama starring E. G. Marshall and Robert Reed. At Abbey Road Studios, the Beatles continue work on what will be the Help! soundtrack, including nine takes of “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” during an afternoon session. John Coltrane and his band continue a session at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The Who plays the London borough of Ealing. Elsewhere in London, Rod Stewart and the Soul Agents play the Marquee Club. The Beach Boys play Worcester, Massachusetts.

At WKY in Oklahoma City, Petula Clark holds the #1 spot on the new Top 50 again this week with “Downtown.” Shirley Bassey’s “Goldfinger” is #2, and “King of the Road” by Roger Miller is up to #3. Two versions of “Red Roses for a Blue Lady,” an instrumental by Bert Kaempfert and a vocal by Vic Dana, are new in the Top 10, sharing the #6 position. Also new in the Top 10: “The Birds and the Bees” by Jewel Akens and the Kinks with “All Day and All of the Night.” The Beatles are exploding up the chart with “Eight Days a Week” and “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party,” up from #48 last week to #12 this week. Also making a gigantic leap is the double-sided Gerry and the Pacemakers hit “Ferry Cross the Mersey” and “Pretend,” which went from #43 to #14, and “Midnight Special” by Johnny Rivers is up to #19 from #46 one week ago. Eleven songs are new among the Top 50. They include “Shotgun” by Jr. Walker and the All-Stars, “People Get Ready” by the Impressions, and “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” by the Animals. The highest debut, however, belongs to George Jones and Gene Pitney. Their song “I’ve Got Five Dollars and It’s Saturday Night” comes on all the way up at #21.

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April 11, 1965: How Dangerous

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(Pictured: This is not the tornado that struck my family’s farm on April 11, 1965, although it looms that large in my memory.)

April 11, 1965 was Palm Sunday. Across the middle of the country, it’s the first warm spring day. In an old schoolhouse near his ranch in Texas, President Johnson signs the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation’s first law federally funding schools. Johnson, who had been a teacher himself as a young man, is joined for the ceremony by his first teacher. In today’s Peanuts strip, Charlie Brown battles the kite-eating tree. House Minority Leader Gerald Ford speaks at a dinner in Chicago and encourages support for the Israel Bonds Program. In his mostly lighthearted speech he compares Israel, “surrounded by a numerically larger and hostile army,” to the Congressional GOP, whom Ford says are similarly outnumbered by the Democrats. A gigantic tornado outbreak strikes the Midwest. Over approximately 11 hours, 47 tornadoes are reported from Iowa to Ohio. Storms in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio come with winds in excess of 200 MPH, and 271 people are killed. The most fatalities occur in Indiana, including 36 in and around Elkhart. Among the first communities to be hit is Monroe, Wisconsin, about 2:00 in the afternoon. The tornado carves a 27-mile path through Green, Rock, and Dane counties, destroying or damaging homes, businesses, and over 400 cars. Forty injuries are reported, but no fatalities. Winds in the Monroe tornado are estimated to have reached over 100 MPH.

A Texas entrepreneur announces the formation of the United States Football League, which will have six franchises in major cities. It is to begin play in the spring of 1966 with its championship game on Memorial Day, but the new professional league will never get off the ground. Conference finals continue in the National Basketball Association. The Boston Celtics and Los Angeles Lakers take 3-2 leads in their respective series with wins today. In the National Hockey League, the Detroit Red Wings beat the Chicago Black Hawks 4-2 to take a 3-2 lead in their semifinal series. Marvin Panch wins the NASCAR Atlanta 500. Baseball’s regular season begins tomorrow; today the Chicago Cubs acquire pitcher Ted Abernathy from the Cleveland Indians in exchange for cash.

On TV tonight, ABC broadcasts Wagon Train and the sitcom Broadside, about a group of Navy WAVES assigned to a base in the South Pacific. Bonanza anchors NBC’s lineup. On CBS tonight, following Lassie and My Favorite Martian, Ed Sullivan welcomes Gerry and the Pacemakers (who are promoting their movie Ferry Cross the Mersey), Maurice Chevalier, and Soupy Sales among his guests. In London, the Beatles close the annual all-star concert presented by New Musical Express, which features the winners of the magazine’s annual popularity poll. It’s the third year the Beatles have appeared. Also on the bill: the Moody Blues, the Rolling Stones, Them, the Animals, the Kinks, and several other acts.

At WRIT in Milwaukee, several of the acts from the NME show are on the station’s latest survey. “I’m Telling You Now” by Freddie and the Dreamers is #1; “Game of Love” by Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders moves to #2. The hottest record on the chart is “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” by Herman’s Hermits, moving from #20 to #3. (Herman’s version of “Silhouettes makes another strong move, from #32 to 20.) Also new in the Top 10 are “Go Now” by the Moody Blues and “The Clapping Song” by Shirley Ellis. Also moving up: “Count Me In” by Gary Lewis and the Playboys (to #22 from #34).

Perspective From the Present: The National Weather Service in Kansas City and local weather bureaus knew about the ripe conditions for tornadoes and severe thunderstorms, so at about 10:45AM, they issued a Severe Weather Forecast, which was standard operating procedure at the time. At 1:00, they updated it to say that “one or two tornadoes” might occur, but they identified a huge area of threat—essentially from Madison to Peoria and Cedar Rapids to Chicago, about 50,000 square miles. But by then, tornadoes were already hitting Iowa. (My family and I heard that updated forecast on a Rockford, Illinois, radio station in the car on the way back from our Sunday dinner.) Further alerts were issued as the storms moved across Illinois and Indiana, but the terminology wasn’t clear enough about the urgency of the situation, and as a result, many people were unaware just how dangerous the storms were. In the aftermath, the National Weather Service devised the tornado watch and tornado warning terminology that we use today.

My first baseball glove, which I would get when I started playing organized ball three or four years hence, was a Ted Abernathy autographed model.

March 20, 1965: Showdown

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(Pictured: Matt Dillon vs. a bad guy, as seen on Gunsmoke.)

March 20, 1965, is a Saturday. Ahmadou Ahidjo is reelected president of Cameroon. In the United States, President Johnson announces that he will call up units of the Alabama National Guard to supervise a third civil-rights march from Selma to Montgomery that is set to begin tomorrow. The first march two weeks ago turned violent when state troopers attacked marchers as they crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma. After making the announcement at the Texas White House, Johnson also discusses the situation in Vietnam and announces several federal appointments before taking questions from reporters. NASA continues preparations for tomorrow’s launch of Ranger 9, which will be the last of several probes sent to photograph the moon before intentionally being crashed into it. In today’s Peanuts strip, Lucy continues her weeklong battle against Linus’ security blanket. Inventor Leandro Malicay of Los Angeles files a patent application for a coconut shredding device. Fans of the the Chicago Cubs are mourning the death of play-by-play announcer Jack Quinlan, who died in a traffic accident last night in Arizona. He was 38, and had done Cubs games on radio since 1952. Actress Dorothy Malone of Peyton Place is on the cover of TV Guide.

Bonanza tops the primetime lineup on NBC tonight; CBS has episodes of Gilligan’s Island and Gunsmoke. In southern Wisconsin, regular programming on the local ABC affiliate is pre-empted by coverage of the state boys’ basketball tournament. Monroe completes an undefeated season by winning the championship 74-71 over Eau Claire Memorial. In Portland, Oregon, UCLA wins the NCAA Division 1 men’s basketball championship over Michigan 91-80. It’s the second straight NCAA championship for UCLA. In the consolation game between losers of the national semifinals, Princeton beat Wichita State, 118-82. Princeton’s Bill Bradley is named the tournament’s most outstanding player. St. John’s defeats Villanova 55-51 to win the NIT.

Bob Dylan plays Buffalo, New York. The Motortown Revue, starring the Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas, the Miracles, and Stevie Wonder, begins its three-week tour of Europe at Astoria Hall in Finsbury Park, England. Judy Garland wraps up a week of appearances at the Fountainbleu Hotel in Miami. At WMCA in New York, B. Mitchel Reid does his last show before returning to KWFB in Los Angeles, from which he’d come two years before. “Stop! In the Name of Love” by the Supremes is #1 on the WMCA survey dated March 18; two other Motown songs are also in the Top 10: “Shotgun” by Junior Walker & the All-Stars at #7 and “My Girl” by the Temptations at #9. Three British Invasion stars are in the Top 10 also: the Beatles with “Eight Days a Week” at #3, Freddie and the Dreamers with “I’m Telling You Now” at #4, and Herman’s Hermits with “Can’t You Hear My Heartbeat” at #5. Shirley Bassey’s “Goldfinger” and Roger Miller’s “King of the Road” are also in the WMCA Top 10.

Perspective From the Present: Although Monroe has won state boys’ and girls’ basketball championships in more recent times, the 1965 team retains a great hold on the imagination of the locals. It was a one-class tournament back then, which meant that Monroe, a town of about 8,000 then, was competing against much bigger schools. (Monroe’s win came in the middle of a stretch in which Milwaukee Lincoln, a school that no longer exists, won four championships in seven years; one of the other schools qualifying for the 1965 tournament was the suburban Milwaukee school Wauwatosa East, my wife’s alma mater.) Thousands of fans greeted the champs when they returned to town on Sunday riding aboard a fire truck. The caravan of cars that greeted them as they came down Highway 69 is fondly remembered around town. Although I have no memory of it, my family was in one of them. Years later, the team picture of the 1965 champions would look down on us in the high school cafeteria every day.